The ruin of Old Kea Church

A while back I wrote a series of posts about ruined places. Ruined churches, cottages and farms. There is something endlessly interesting, something that sparks my imagination, about broken down, forgotten buildings. How they came to be there. How they once looked. Who touched their walls, walked their halls. How they fell into disrepair. Old […]

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The history of Carn Brea Castle

There are a handful of man-made landmarks in Cornwall that are unmistakable and unforgettable. Carn Brea Castle is one of these. A tiny fortress perched high on one of our most enigmatic hills it is pretty magical. Carn Brea Castle stands on the eastern summit of Carn Brea hill, one of the highest points in […]

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Review – Estah’s Story at Heartlands

Discovering the story of Estah, a Cornish Bal Maiden, against the breath-taking backdrop of the World Heritage Site at Heartlands was truly wonderful. It will certainly be one of my lasting memories of this summer. This inventive production weaves together threads of Cornwall’s mining past. From the far-flung journeys of our intrepid miners, to the […]

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Copplestone Cross & his Packhorse Bridge, Porthcothan

One way or another we would all like to leave a legacy. For some people that might be their children. For me perhaps it will be my writing, and for my father, well, one of his legacies will be a large piece of granite. Whatever the case, I believe that most of us would like […]

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Review: The Cornish Cook Book

Cornwall is rich. Rich in heritage, rich in beautiful natural resources and rich with some of the finest produce from land and sea. The Cornish Cook Book is the latest in a long tradition of local cook books designed to celebrate this richness. To delight in all that Cornwall has to offer. The Cornish Cook […]

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Cavalla Bianca – an unusual wreck in Penzance

We are very used to hearing about the Cornish taking advantage of bounty brought to its shores by the ferocious sea. Tales of crowds of the opportunistic, greedy, and probably at times desperate, inhabitants swarming over a beached vessel and plundering all they can. Stripping a ship, and sometimes its crew bare, before the arrival […]

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The Mawgan Cross – an Inscribed Stone in Meneage

At one time the area now known as Goonhilly Downs, and indeed most of the Lizard, was called the Meneage. How exactly the area came by this name is the subject of some debate. Folliott-Stokes writes in 1928: In olden days it [the Lizard] was called Meneage from the Cornish word ‘maenic’ (rocky) though certain […]

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The Trenear Mortar Stone – Treasure in a car park!

We already know that Cornwall is pretty special. The sublime scenery, the temperate climate, the precious wildlife . . . the pasties. But in the Bronze Age it was something else that drove the economy. The tin and cooper found close to the surface and running through the veins of Cornwall’s bedrock. And the unique […]

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Review: Five Million Tides, a biography of the Helford River by Christian Boulton

There are certain aspects of our Cornish landscape that are a comforting constant. The tireless sea, the iron-stone tors and the daily ebb and flow of the tidal rivers. Cliché or not, they are familiar, like old friends. This is not to say that any of these things are static, on the contrary, they are […]

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The Lizard Windmill & the notorious Windmill Gang

In many ways the communities on the Lizard are the most isolated in Cornwall. As wild and as sparsely populated as Bodmin Moor the peninsula has an added sense of otherness and seclusion that comes perhaps from being encircled by the untamed sea. In the early 19th century the Lizard was notorious for its lawlessness. […]

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