The Bleu Bridge inscribed stone – Gulval

Bleu Bridge stone Gulval

The vast majority of our ancient monuments in Cornwall are quite plain. They may be dramatic in their setting, their age or their size but they often demonstrate to us the effects of the elements more than the mark of the hands that built them. There are, however, a few exceptions to this. Places in […]

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Ten Top Birdwatching Spots in Cornwall

Cornwall is a paradise for birdwatching. The county’s position, stretching out into the Atlantic, surrounded by hundreds of miles of beautiful coastline, means that not only is it an ideal stopping off point for many migratory species but it often has unusual visitors. Birds that have been blown off course or over-shot their intended destination […]

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Cornwall’s Prehistoric Holed Stones

kenidjack holed stone

The idea that the ancient stones scattered about Cornwall are the monumental remains of an ancient society, who’s motivations and ideas, are now a mystery to us has always fascinated me. As I have mentioned before whenever we had any free time when I was a child my father would take us to see a […]

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Ballowal Barrow, Cape Cornwall

Dramatically situated on the cliffs close to Cape Cornwall, Ballowal Barrow is a unique monument. This ancient tomb was once the final resting place for Bronze Age man. And is actually part of a complex of burial cairns and cists in use from the Late Neolithic, around 5000 years ago. The monument would have been […]

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Boleigh Fogou – Rosemerryn, Lamorna

The narrow lane to Boleigh fogou takes you by surprise. Tucked away on a bend, just after the turning to Lamorna Cove, the entrance is narrow and one side lined with large granite boulders. Up until yesterday I had never been here before. The fact that you must pre-arrange a time to come and see […]

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Carn Kenidjack – the Hooting Cairn

We’ve all heard the stories. Unsuspecting travellers on some dark, remote road being led astray by strange lights, false paths or mysterious strangers and becoming hopelessly lost. The Cornish call it being piskie-led, (it often happens on the way home from the pub) and there are certain paths that were once famous for such misadventures. […]

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The Prehistoric beach of Porth Nanven

cot valley porth naven

Cot Valley is a magical place that feels a world away from the hustle of modern life. This beautiful valley even has its own micro-climate. As you walk down towards the V of blue sea enclosed by the valley walls, a stream winds it way beside the road, through sub-tropical plants and past ancient tin […]

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A Potted History of Hell’s Mouth, Cornwall

Can there be a more ominous name for a craggy Cornish cove than Hell’s Mouth? . . .Well, perhaps Deadman’s Cove, which just happens to be the next beach north along the coast. Indeed, it can be said that this is Cornwall at it’s most dramatic. The cliffs on this staggering stretch of coast, just […]

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Levant Mine and the Tin Coast – Rising Fortunes & Going Underground!

Levant mine

The old crumbling workings of Levant Mine, close to the village of Pendeen, are part of the Cornish Mining World Heritage Site and were once cared for by the Trevithick Society. Recently, the so called ‘Poldark effect’ has meant that visitor numbers here have risen a massive 40% and the present caretakers, the National Trust, […]

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Chapel Carn Brea – Cornwall’s First and Last Hill

Chapel Carn Brea is said to be the first and last hill in Britain. Just south of St Just in Penwith it overlooks the dramatic rocky peninsula of Lands End and stunning Sennen coastline. This hill is a focal point in this part of Cornwall, and has been for thousands of years. The First and […]

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