St Agnes Beacon

The view from St Agnes Beacon is breath-taking. The high moorlands, heather and gorse clad; steep valleys and bubbling streams; the bracing winds and the infinite variety of land and seascape . . . S H Burton, 1955 The view from the top of St Agnes Beacon is one of the most impressive in Cornwall. […]

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The history of the Willapark Lookout, Boscastle

John Lloyd Warden Page described his visit to Boscastle in 1897. The romantic harbour, the flashing stream, the tortuous cliffs. And Willapark Lookout standing above it all. The entrance is guarded by the low headland of Pelly Point, crowned by a rock bearing a curious resemblance to a tortoise with head uplifted. The towering height […]

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King Doniert’s Stone

Finding remains that can be irrefutably linked with the Kings of Cornwall is difficult. It feels as if these men have almost completely disappeared into the mists of time. Forgotten by history and the population they once ruled over. Mythical kings , such as Arthur, have taken their place. But these kings were real men. […]

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Come-to-Good & Cornwall’s Oldest Quaker Meeting House

Come-to-Good, England's oldest Quaker meeting house

‘The small old white meeting house is surrounded by a yet older small green burial ground where long grasses and flowers innumerable cover the gentle slopes. The soft mounds cluster around the walls, as if those who were laid there had wished their bodies might rest as near as possible to the house of peace […]

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Godrevy Lighthouse

The view of Godrevy Lighthouse on its little off-shore island is one of Cornwall’s most iconic. From wherever you see it, along the coast from St Ives to Gwithian and beyond, the image leaves an impression. It’s one of Cornwall’s most photographed landmarks, drawing artists, poets and writers to it from the time it was […]

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Boskednan Stone Circle

Monoliths, quoits, cairns and circles of stone, Cornwall is home to more megalithic sites per square mile than anywhere else in Britain. Of the 20 or so stone circles that remain today many more have been lost or destroyed. Cornwall’s stone circles may not be as large or dramatic as those found in other parts […]

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Gyllyngdune Gardens & Falmouth’s Shell House

Falmouth is blessed with beautiful public gardens, many of which were once the private grounds of the town’s wealthiest families. Gyllyngdune (pronounced gillingdoon) is tucked away between the Princess Pavilions and the sea. It is one of the smallest gardens but contains some rather extraordinary features. In 1837 General William Jesser Coope bought 16 acres […]

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Alsia Well & some history of Wishing Wells

“Half hidden at the end of secret pathways, stumbled upon near old streams, nestled at the bottom of remote valleys far from modern-day roads and cottages, Cornwall’s holy wells are places of peace and contemplation, and refuge from the strains and pressures of 20th century civilization.” -Cheryl Straffon. In his book Secret Shrines Paul Broadhurst […]

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The Cunaide Stone – Hayle’s 5th century burial stone.

Just before Christmas 2018 the Cunaide Stone was moved inside for it’s own protection. Up until last year this rare 5th century burial stone had spent 175 years exposed to the elements. It was time for a little TLC! The picture above is the stone in its broken state before restoration. The Cunaide stone was […]

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The Treburrick Standing Stone & interpreting menhirs.

This incredible menhir is pretty isolated. Roughly a mile from some of Cornwall’s most beautiful coastal scenery, this old stone stands alone on a hillside. The Treburrick standing stone is a huge piece of bright white quartz. Covered in lichen, it is 6 feet 6 inches high and sits in a circular depression, probably caused by […]

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