Boleigh Fogou – Rosemerryn, Lamorna

The narrow lane to Boleigh fogou takes you by surprise. Tucked away on a bend, just after the turning to Lamorna Cove, the entrance is narrow and one side lined with large granite boulders. Up until yesterday I had never been here before. The fact that you must pre-arrange a time to come and see […]

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Carn Kenidjack – the Hooting Cairn

We’ve all heard the stories. Unsuspecting travellers on some dark, remote road being led astray by strange lights, false paths or mysterious strangers and becoming hopelessly lost. The Cornish call it being piskie-led, (it often happens on the way home from the pub) and there are certain paths that were once famous for such misadventures. […]

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The Prehistoric beach of Porth Nanven

cot valley porth naven

Cot Valley is a magical place that feels a world away from the hustle of modern life. This beautiful valley even has its own micro-climate. As you walk down towards the V of blue sea enclosed by the valley walls, a stream winds it way beside the road, through sub-tropical plants and past ancient tin […]

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Chapel Carn Brea – Cornwall’s First and Last Hill

Chapel Carn Brea is said to be the first and last hill in Britain. Just a little south of St Just in Penwith overlooking the dramatic rocky peninsula of Lands End and stunning Sennen coastline, this hill is a focal point in this part of Cornwall, and has been for thousands of years.

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What connects Cornwall, Ketchup & Charles De Gaulle?

I really don’t remember the last time that I visited Lands End, for me the famous point that so many travel to see has been turned into some kind of strange theme park, expensive and overcrowded.  I do however still love it’s sister headland, Cape Cornwall. In the summer it also has it’s fair share of visitors […]

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Rock Solid Love

I grew up in a household where farm work and animals came first above anything else.  Don’t misunderstand me, I am not complaining, I had a blessed childhood with a kind of freedom that sadly very few children experience today.  It taught me not only independence but also the importance of hard work and responsibility.  However […]

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Celebrating the Rather Eccentric Mr Knill

John Knill loved St Ives and more than 2oo years after his death St Ives is still remembering him.  This rather eccentric philanthropist (some say smuggler) wanted to provide for the people he had grown so fond of and to guarantee that his name would be remembered for all time in the town that he made his […]

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Boscawen un – When is a Stone Circle not a stone circle?

The names spin by outside the car, Buryas Bridge, Drift, Catchall and then I see the tiny turning that I need and swing the car in, on to the dirt road.  This is the track to Boscawen-un, one of the first ancient places on the Penwith that I ever came to.  That was probably 20 years […]

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Zennor Quoit: Take a walk with me

Driving out of Zennor village towards St Ives there is a house known as the Eagles Nest perched on a crag looking out to sea.  It was in the valley below this house that D H Lawrence spent 1915 writing Women in Love and just opposite its white painted gate there is a track leading out across the downs.  […]

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The Raising of Logan Rock

In Cornwall we have a special kind of geological feature that throughout history has given the Cornish folks bucket loads of joy.  It is the natural phenomena known as the Logan Rock. The word logan comes from the Cornish ‘logging’, meaning rocking and refers to a number of rocks which through some a happy accident are on a pivot […]

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