Hangman’s Barrow, Crowan

Some place names can really create an atmosphere and evoke a feeling. They can be signpost to a place’s past. A waving flag that acknowledges some event or episode in our cultural history. Names are, after all given, given by us. And because of this for me Hangman’s Barrow near Crowan has its own particular […]

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The ruin of Old Kea Church

A while back I wrote a series of posts about ruined places. Ruined churches, cottages and farms. There is something endlessly interesting, something that sparks my imagination, about broken down, forgotten buildings. How they came to be there. How they once looked. Who touched their walls, walked their halls. How they fell into disrepair. Old […]

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The history of Carn Brea Castle

There are a handful of man-made landmarks in Cornwall that are unmistakable and unforgettable. Carn Brea Castle is one of these. A tiny fortress perched high on one of our most enigmatic hills it is pretty magical. Carn Brea Castle stands on the eastern summit of Carn Brea hill, one of the highest points in […]

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The Trenear Mortar Stone – Treasure in a car park!

We already know that Cornwall is pretty special. The sublime scenery, the temperate climate, the precious wildlife . . . the pasties. But in the Bronze Age it was something else that drove the economy. The tin and cooper found close to the surface and running through the veins of Cornwall’s bedrock. And the unique […]

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Review: Five Million Tides, a biography of the Helford River by Christian Boulton

There are certain aspects of our Cornish landscape that are a comforting constant. The tireless sea, the iron-stone tors and the daily ebb and flow of the tidal rivers. Cliché or not, they are familiar, like old friends. This is not to say that any of these things are static, on the contrary, they are […]

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St Agnes Beacon

The view from St Agnes Beacon is breath-taking. The high moorlands, heather and gorse clad; steep valleys and bubbling streams; the bracing winds and the infinite variety of land and seascape . . . S H Burton, 1955 The view from the top of St Agnes Beacon is one of the most impressive in Cornwall. […]

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Come-to-Good & Cornwall’s Ancient Quaker Meeting House

Come-to-Good, England's oldest Quaker meeting house

‘The small old white meeting house is surrounded by a yet older small green burial ground where long grasses and flowers innumerable cover the gentle slopes. The soft mounds cluster around the walls, as if those who were laid there had wished their bodies might rest as near as possible to the house of peace […]

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Godrevy Lighthouse

The view of Godrevy Lighthouse on its little off-shore island is one of Cornwall’s most iconic. From wherever you see it, along the coast from St Ives to Gwithian and beyond, the image leaves an impression. It’s one of Cornwall’s most photographed landmarks, drawing artists, poets and writers to it from the time it was […]

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Gyllyngdune Gardens & Falmouth’s Shell House

Falmouth is blessed with beautiful public gardens, many of which were once the private grounds of the town’s wealthiest families. Gyllyngdune (pronounced gillingdoon) is tucked away between the Princess Pavilions and the sea. It is one of the smallest gardens but contains some rather extraordinary features. In 1837 General William Jesser Coope bought 16 acres […]

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The Cunaide Stone – Hayle’s 5th century burial stone.

Just before Christmas 2018 the Cunaide Stone was moved inside for it’s own protection. Up until last year this rare 5th century burial stone had spent 175 years exposed to the elements. It was time for a little TLC! The picture above is the stone in its broken state before restoration. The Cunaide stone was […]

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