Copplestone Cross & his Packhorse Bridge, Porthcothan

One way or another we would all like to leave a legacy. For some people that might be their children. For me perhaps it will be my writing, and for my father, well, one of his legacies will be a large piece of granite. Whatever the case, I believe that most of us would like […]

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Cavalla Bianca – an unusual wreck in Penzance

We are very used to hearing about the Cornish taking advantage of bounty brought to its shores by the ferocious sea. Tales of crowds of the opportunistic, greedy, and probably at times desperate, inhabitants swarming over a beached vessel and plundering all they can. Stripping a ship, and sometimes its crew bare, before the arrival […]

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The Lizard Windmill & the notorious Windmill Gang

In many ways the communities on the Lizard are the most isolated in Cornwall. As wild and as sparsely populated as Bodmin Moor the peninsula has an added sense of otherness and seclusion that comes perhaps from being encircled by the untamed sea. In the early 19th century the Lizard was notorious for its lawlessness. […]

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Real Cornish Giants, where legends begin

In wandering over some of the uncultivated tracts which still maintain their wilderness . . . against the march of cultivation, we are certain of finding rude masses of rock which have some relation to the giants. The giant’s hand or the giant’s chair or it may be the giant’s punch bowl excites your curiosity. […]

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Virginia Woolf in Cornwall

Here we are on the verge of going to Cornwall. This time tomorrow we shall be stepping onto the platform at Penzance, sniffing the air, looking for our trap and then driving off across the moors to Zennor. Why am I so incredibly and incurably romantic about Cornwall? – Virginia Woolf, 22nd March 1921 Some […]

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The Mermaid Chair, Zennor

The Mermiad Chair of Zennor

Which came first – the carving or the legend? It’s almost impossible to say for sure. There are other stories of Cornish mermaids at Padstow, Lamorna Cove, Seaton, Cury and Perranzabuloe. But the legend of the Mermaid of Zennor seems the most deeply embedded in the psyche of the Cornwall. And is one of the […]

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St Agnes Beacon

The view from St Agnes Beacon is breath-taking. The high moorlands, heather and gorse clad; steep valleys and bubbling streams; the bracing winds and the infinite variety of land and seascape . . . S H Burton, 1955 The view from the top of St Agnes Beacon is one of the most impressive in Cornwall. […]

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The history of the Willapark Lookout, Boscastle

John Lloyd Warden Page described his visit to Boscastle in 1897. The romantic harbour, the flashing stream, the tortuous cliffs. And Willapark Lookout standing above it all. The entrance is guarded by the low headland of Pelly Point, crowned by a rock bearing a curious resemblance to a tortoise with head uplifted. The towering height […]

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King Doniert’s Stone

Finding remains that can be irrefutably linked with the Kings of Cornwall is difficult. It feels as if these men have almost completely disappeared into the mists of time. Forgotten by history and the population they once ruled over. Mythical kings , such as Arthur, have taken their place. But these kings were real men. […]

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Come-to-Good & Cornwall’s Ancient Quaker Meeting House

Come-to-Good, England's oldest Quaker meeting house

‘The small old white meeting house is surrounded by a yet older small green burial ground where long grasses and flowers innumerable cover the gentle slopes. The soft mounds cluster around the walls, as if those who were laid there had wished their bodies might rest as near as possible to the house of peace […]

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