The Trenear Mortar Stone – Treasure in a car park!

We already know that Cornwall is pretty special. The sublime scenery, the temperate climate, the precious wildlife . . . the pasties. But in the Bronze Age it was something else that drove the economy. The tin and cooper found close to the surface and running through the veins of Cornwall’s bedrock. And the unique […]

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Gerennius, King of Cornwall & his Golden Boat.

Just outside the village of Veryan, which is most famous for its round houses, there is a large mound in the middle of a field. It is known as Carne Beacon because it was at one time used as a signal point. But beneath the turf legend has it a king is buried. King Gerennius, […]

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St Agnes Beacon

The view from St Agnes Beacon is breath-taking. The high moorlands, heather and gorse clad; steep valleys and bubbling streams; the bracing winds and the infinite variety of land and seascape . . . S H Burton, 1955 The view from the top of St Agnes Beacon is one of the most impressive in Cornwall. […]

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King Doniert’s Stone

Finding remains that can be irrefutably linked with the Kings of Cornwall is difficult. It feels as if these men have almost completely disappeared into the mists of time. Forgotten by history and the population they once ruled over. Mythical kings , such as Arthur, have taken their place. But these kings were real men. […]

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The Cheesewring

Perhaps Cornwall’s oldest tourist attraction, the Cheesewring has been drawing people to the lonely moors near Bodmin for centuries. This dramatic granite rock formation can be found halfway up the west side of Stowes Hill. Completely natural, this monument is the result of thousands of years of weathering. Many other similar rock formations can be […]

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Boskednan Stone Circle

Monoliths, quoits, cairns and circles of stone, Cornwall is home to more megalithic sites per square mile than anywhere else in Britain. Of the 20 or so stone circles that remain today many more have been lost or destroyed. Cornwall’s stone circles may not be as large or dramatic as those found in other parts […]

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Alsia Well & some history of Wishing Wells

“Half hidden at the end of secret pathways, stumbled upon near old streams, nestled at the bottom of remote valleys far from modern-day roads and cottages, Cornwall’s holy wells are places of peace and contemplation, and refuge from the strains and pressures of 20th century civilization.” -Cheryl Straffon. In his book Secret Shrines Paul Broadhurst […]

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The Cunaide Stone – Hayle’s 5th century burial stone.

Just before Christmas 2018 the Cunaide Stone was moved inside for it’s own protection. Up until last year this rare 5th century burial stone had spent 175 years exposed to the elements. It was time for a little TLC! The picture above is the stone in its broken state before restoration. The Cunaide stone was […]

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The Treburrick Standing Stone & interpreting menhirs.

This incredible menhir is pretty isolated. Roughly a mile from some of Cornwall’s most beautiful coastal scenery, this old stone stands alone on a hillside. The Treburrick standing stone is a huge piece of bright white quartz. Covered in lichen, it is 6 feet 6 inches high and sits in a circular depression, probably caused […]

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Merther Uny – Ancient Cross & Chapel

When I first read about Merther Uny I was intrigued. I was fascinated to see this ruined place. A place that had once been so important. A site of peace and pilgrimage. It is still a peaceful place today. Isolated down a dead-end farm track and hidden in a shady glade above a wooded valley. […]

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