The Trippet Stones

“These simple but powerful relics of the past will turn anyone into a romantic.” E. C. Axford, 1975 The moors are my escape. I find contentment there whatever the season, even on the wettest and wildest of days. A few days ago it was one of those sunny days when the fluffy white clouds seem […]

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Hangman’s Barrow, Crowan

Some place names can really create an atmosphere and evoke a feeling. They can be signpost to a place’s past. A waving flag that acknowledges some event or episode in our cultural history. Names are, after all given, given by us. And because of this for me Hangman’s Barrow near Crowan has its own particular […]

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The Mawgan Cross – an Inscribed Stone in Meneage

At one time the area now known as Goonhilly Downs, and indeed most of the Lizard, was called the Meneage. How exactly the area came by this name is the subject of some debate. Folliott-Stokes writes in 1928: In olden days it [the Lizard] was called Meneage from the Cornish word ‘maenic’ (rocky) though certain […]

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The Trenear Mortar Stone – Treasure in a car park!

We already know that Cornwall is pretty special. The sublime scenery, the temperate climate, the precious wildlife . . . the pasties. But in the Bronze Age it was something else that drove the economy. The tin and cooper found close to the surface and running through the veins of Cornwall’s bedrock. And the unique […]

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Gerennius, King of Cornwall & his Golden Boat.

Just outside the village of Veryan, which is most famous for its round houses, there is a large mound in the middle of a field. It is known as Carne Beacon because it was at one time used as a signal point. But beneath the turf legend has it a king is buried. King Gerennius, […]

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St Agnes Beacon

The view from St Agnes Beacon is breath-taking. The high moorlands, heather and gorse clad; steep valleys and bubbling streams; the bracing winds and the infinite variety of land and seascape . . . S H Burton, 1955 The view from the top of St Agnes Beacon is one of the most impressive in Cornwall. […]

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King Doniert’s Stone

Finding remains that can be irrefutably linked with the Kings of Cornwall is difficult. It feels as if these men have almost completely disappeared into the mists of time. Forgotten by history and the population they once ruled over. Mythical kings , such as Arthur, have taken their place. But these kings were real men. […]

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The Cheesewring

Perhaps Cornwall’s oldest tourist attraction, the Cheesewring has been drawing people to the lonely moors near Bodmin for centuries. This dramatic granite rock formation can be found halfway up the west side of Stowes Hill. Completely natural, this monument is the result of thousands of years of weathering. Many other similar rock formations can be […]

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Boskednan Stone Circle

Monoliths, quoits, cairns and circles of stone, Cornwall is home to more megalithic sites per square mile than anywhere else in Britain. Of the 20 or so stone circles that remain today many more have been lost or destroyed. Cornwall’s stone circles may not be as large or dramatic as those found in other parts […]

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Alsia Well & some history of Wishing Wells

“Half hidden at the end of secret pathways, stumbled upon near old streams, nestled at the bottom of remote valleys far from modern-day roads and cottages, Cornwall’s holy wells are places of peace and contemplation, and refuge from the strains and pressures of 20th century civilization.” -Cheryl Straffon. In his book Secret Shrines Paul Broadhurst […]

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