Trelill Holy Well – Cornwall’s first scheduled monument

Trelill Well sits in a quiet wooded valley that, at this time of year, is swathed in billows of cow parsley, campions and fox gloves.

This pretty well which was the first monument in Cornwall to be scheduled in 1922 (CO 1), was almost forgotten until quite recently. Dedicated to St Wendrona in 1423 it was known as Fenton Wendron and is typical of medieval structures of its type.

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Meeting the Angels of Death at Heligan

The personification of death in art and mythology is common. Abaddon in the Book of Revelation, Azrael in Islam, Yama in Hinduism even the Santa Muerte in Mexico. These guardians of the underworld are the keepers of the gates into the afterlife, the bringers of doom and the escorts of departed souls. So, let’s just say I wasn’t too sure what to expect when I arranged to meet a party of them, at Heligan the other evening.

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Rehearsals for Wildworks’ summer performance 100:Unearth are in full swing, and I have been invited to meet some of the people involved and get a sneak preview of the show!

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WildWork’s Wall of Love – who will you add?

It all began back on 2014 when WildWorks made history. Over 5000 people joined in their commemoration of the centenary of the beginning of WW1 by remembering the community’s lost men in a powerful dawn ‘til dusk performance. That performance was called 100: The Day Our World Changed and took place at the Lost Gardens of Heligan.

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Now this July WildWorks return with 100: Unearth a production about love, loss and hope that marks the end of the war. And again they want the whole community with them. Continue reading

Visit Egyptian House, Penzance

Much of Penzance’s Chapel Street is lined with historical buildings, many dating from the 18th century but at the top of the street there is a building truly like no other in the whole of Cornwall.

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Egyptian House, Nos 6 -7 Chapel Street, is a rare survivor of a style of architecture that became fashionable after Napoleon’s campaign in Egypt in 1798. But this grand building had rather more humble beginnings. Continue reading

Elementum – Review of a journal of nature and story.

Elementum is a beautiful treasure trove of words and imagery. This is not a read today – recycled tomorrow magazine, this is something dive into, immerse yourself in and ultimately cherish.

Reading it feels as if you are being drawn into each of the contributors’ worlds where there are legions of stories waiting to be told.

DSC02414Now in it’s 4th edition, each Elementum journal focuses on a different theme that explores our connection with the natural world. Continue reading

Kerbed Cairn on Alex Tor, Bodmin Moor

In recent weeks the local papers have been alive with the news of a unique discovery. A 4000 years old cremation urn was uncovered, beautifully complete, during an excavation of Hendersick Barrow, near Looe. There is understandably great excitement about what these remains can tell us about our ancient ancestors and their burial rites and practices. With such a important find coming to light it is worth remembering that there are hundreds, possibly thousands, of similar funerary monuments dotted all across Cornwall.

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Love, Loss and Knitting with WildWorks at Heligan – Be a part of it!

A few weeks ago I wrote about the new WildWorks production at Heligan and their call for participants from the local community. Rehearsals will get underway in June, so there is still time to be part of what will be a truly unique event.

However, if being in the limelight is not really your thing have no fear, you can still play a part in 100:Unearth WildWorks tribute to all those effected by war. WildWorks Theatre still needs your help with their inspirational supporting projects. The first one is a call to arms for all knitters! Continue reading

Botanical Art with Scientific Illustration – Review of Sarah Jane Humphrey’s new book

There is something special, satisfying even, about finding beauty in the small things in life. Taking the time to notice the marvellous minutiae of the natural world that surrounds us, especially here in Cornwall where we are blessed with so much wild flora and fauna.

Sarah Jane Humphry’s enchanting new book takes us from the blousy beauty of the Cornish hedgerow into the precise world of botanical illustration. With each gorgeous page the close observation and the rendering of every delicate detail a new and fascinated world opens up, just under our noses.

Cornish illustrator Sarah Jane Humphrey Botanical Art Continue reading

Figgy Dowdy’s Well – Carn Marth

Figgy Dowdy had a well
On top of Carn Marth hill
She locked it up night and day
Lest people carry the water away!

Carn Marth is the highest of a range of hills that stretch from Gwennap to Camborne. Rising 757ft (230m) above the village of Lanner, it is riddled with quarries and old mine workings. Carn Marth was once a place of refuge in the Bronze Age and the site of one of the beacons that used to be lit across Cornwall in times of war or celebration.

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Our Defenceless Monuments: The Threat to Cornwall’s Heritage

 

Cornwall is blessed with a long and fascinating history. Although visitors are often drawn to the county by the so called ‘Poldark effect’ many more are also seeking out our enigmatic prehistoric monuments. I wanted to take a look at the hidden threat to this precious heritage.

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Cornwall has some of the oldest prehistoric sites in England. The rolling landscape is dotted with hundreds of stone circles, cairns and quoits, some predating the Egyptian pyramids. Continue reading